MEDIA RELEASE: SCOTT MORRISON HAGGLING OVER ROYAL COMMISSION COSTS WHILE PEOPLE WITH DISABILITY AND THEIR FAMILIES WAIT

While people with disability continue to wait, Scott Morrison is haggling with states and territories over who would fund a royal commission.
 
This is a cheapskate move.
 
Today, we are reminded once again that Scott Morrison had to be shamed into action, after the Government said no to a royal commission three times - including voting against it twice in the Parliament.
 
Scott Morrison continues to defer and delay, by trying to offload the cost of this royal commission onto the states and territories. 
 
This didn’t happen with the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, nor the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety – why is this any different?
 
This royal commission should be fully federally funded and Scott Morrison could easily set aside the money for this in the budget.
 
Just last week, Bill Shorten wrote to the premiers and chief ministers to make it clear that if Labor is fortunate enough to form government he would seek their support for this royal commission.
 
Labor committed to a separate, dedicated and fully federally funded royal commission in May 2017.
 
For years, the Abbott-Turnbull-Morrison Government opposed the royal commission. 15 months after the Senate delivered its report into violence, abuse and neglect against people with disability, the Government rejected its recommendations for a royal commission.
 
It has since voted against a royal commission in the Senate twice, as well as attempting to shamefully obstruct it in the House. 
  
Scott Morrison can always seem to find the money for the top end of town - why can’t he find it for a proper inquiry into the abuse of people with disability?
 
People with disability, their families, advocates and representative organisations have fought hard and long enough for this royal commission, they deserve a government who takes it seriously.
 
People with disability deserve a proper, broad-based inquiry to get to the truth. It should cover a wide range of contexts, including into health, mental health, justice and educational settings, as well as historic abuse. 
 
The test for the Government is to fully fund this in the budget and ensure that people with disability and their families are properly consulted in developing the terms of reference.

WEDNESDAY, 27 FEBRUARY 2019